phpiwire updated – now with PWM!

I’ve pushed a few changes to phpiwire can now use the PWM functions in wiringPi.  You can use either the hardware PWM pins or any of the GPIOs by using software PWM.  A couple new examples of how to do this have also been added to the repository.

With software PWM comes the requirement to include pthreads, so that’s also linked when you compile the zephir extension.

I’d recommend you do a full clean first before compiling with:

zephir fullclean
zephir install

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PHP South Coast 2015

I’ve just arrived back from the inaugural PHP South Coast Conference.  It was a really great event that seemed to go without a hitch, had a fantastic range of speakers and a nice bunch of people that attended.  So first of all, a really big thank you! to PHP Hampshire, BrightonPHP and PHP Dorset for putting on a top-notch event – you really wouldn’t have known it was their first one, everything seemed to professional! Continue reading

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Phpiwire: a PHP extension (written using Zephir) for controlling the Raspberry Pi GPIO

So it’s been a while since my lightening talk on Zephir and I realized I hadn’t really done anything to try to learn it a little more in-depth.  Coincidentally, I was recently going through a drawer and realized that one of my Raspberry Pi’s was in there just begging to be put to some use (seriously, I could practically hear it weep).  So I thought that the only thing to do was to attempt to write an extension using Zephir so that I could control the GPIO via PHP.  I mean, isn’t it obvious? Continue reading

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BrightonPHP lightning talk on Zephir

Yesterday I was one of four people to do a lightning talk at BrightonPHP. As anyone who knows me; I hate public speaking with a passion. Anything over, say, four people (usually including me) and I just like to sit there quietly and not say much. But encouraged by @coderabbi’s Wisdom as a Service talk he did at BrightonPHP in February (read: told at the train station by coderabbi that I had to do a talk) and the fact that it was a lightning talk so I didn’t actually have to speak that long, I presented a very brief, high-level overview of Zephir.

If you think any of this is inaccurate, needs tweaking, etc., then please let me know and I’ll happily update it accordingly.

Well done also to Rich, Rowan and Tristan for their very informative talks on, xml/json and selenium (respectively)…  Although I’m the only one that didn’t get an applause after their talk, so you’re all dead to me. 😛

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Opache gui update and now on Packagist

I’ve just pushed to github a big overhaul of the opcache gui script. It comes with a sweeping set of changes which also includes using react.js to power some of the interface to really enhance the real-time updates. (OK, it was really just an excuse for me to learn a little about react.js but I think it was worth it!)

I’ve also put the opcache gui and the php error log gui up on packagist – my first packages on there!  Check ’em out:

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‘Open in PhpStorm’ context menu for Windows

I’ve just started to use PhpStorm, which is a wonderful IDE. However, I wanted to make it even easier for myself to open files and folders. A context menu in Windows fits the bill quite nicely – just right-click on a folder and open in PhpStorm.

This batch file will do just that!

loading gist file...

Just set the path to whatever suits your system and then right-click and ‘run as administrator’ on the batch file.

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JWPlayer thumbnail preview generator

Create video thumbnail previews for JW Player

JWPlayer is a fantastic video player for the web. One of the great features it provides is the ability to show thumbnail previews of the video as you slide along the toolbar timeline, much the same way that YouTube and the like allow.

Generating the thumbnail images is not quite so easy unless you have ffmpeg installed and know a bit about the command line options. I got a little frustrated myself having to come up the with the command line magic whenever I needed it, and so the JW Player thumbnail preview generator was born!

It’s a simple command line tool, written in PHP, that allows you to whip up the thumbnails and generate the required VTT file with a command as simple as:

php thumbnails.php -i "/input/video.mp4"

OK, so you still need to have ffmpeg installed on your machine – not much I can do about that one, sorry! – but at least generating the files is now much easier!

You can generate the individual thumbnails or have them coalesced into  sprite sheet, and generate a random poster image. Full instructions are on my GitHub account; so go, fork, improve, and feel free to give any feedback.

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Effective, clean UI for viewing the PHP error log

Example usage

Recently at work I found myself trawling through the PHP error log file and found that all the lines of text were starting to blur after a while. Thinking there had to be a better way over viewing the log file, and following on from my single-file opcache viewer gui, I decided to knock out something for viewing the error log file as well.

With this single-file error log gui it will only show the error once and then tell you how many times it appears in the log. It will allow you to narrow down your search of errors by being able to hide the different types or sort in different ways, and it will also allow you to search results based on particular file paths.

I’ve pushed the code up to my GitHub account, so please feel free to fork and improve and/or give feedback.

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Counters in CSS: making a table of contents list

As I’m sure you know, you can create an ordered bullet point list but it has limitations.  For example, if I wanted to have a table of contents so that the numbering goes 1, 1.1, 1.2, 1.2.1, 1.2.2, 1.2.3, and so on then the standard ordered list just isn’t going to cut it.  Oh, sure, you could reset the numbering on the sub-lists so that it uses roman numerals or something like that but to me that just doesn’t feel quite right…

Enter CSS counters!

Counters offer you a way to increment and decrement a value every time an element has the rule, and there doesn’t have to be one counter – you can have as many as you need,

So using counters can easily produce the correct kind of TOC list that we want. And here’s the jsFiddle to show you just how easy it is.

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Tweeting on a button press with the Raspberry Pi

A while ago my door bell broke. So I did what any sensible person would; I decided that instead of buying a new one I would hook up an old bell I had to a Raspberry Pi and have the bell ring when someone pushed a button on my door. But then I though, “well, that’s a bit boring.  My doorbell should tweet me, too!”

The long and the short of it is that I couldn’t get the mechanics of the bell ringer to work but had a lot of fun with the tweeting side of things because it involved my first shot at doing some Python code. And the really good news is that it’s ridiculously easy to accomplish.

This was roughly my process…

Continue reading

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